To Honor Nature, You Must Honor Yourself

To Honor Nature, You Must Honor Yourself

Witchfolk and animists frequently refer to the cycles of nature, of understanding that the land and its inhabitants have periods of low activity and rest. We honor that, celebrate the turning of these seasons, and discuss the changes in our environments that take place during these times. I know that everything follows a rhythm and yet I have a cognitive dissonance when it comes to my own rhythms. For months I’ve sat down to write and come up with a few sentences before getting frustrated. I go to my spirits and find little drive or energy to do anything but give offerings. When I become distanced from my art, magic, or writing there are innumerable thoughts of inadequacy that fill my head. Imposter syndrome hits me like a ton of bricks, and I begin to doubt the authenticity of what I do. Effectively I fall into the trap of believing somehow that because I am human I am separated from nature.

Dry season is coming to a close here, and the water is rising in the swamps. Today I went out and spoke to my spirits, they asked me “have you been sleeping?” I honestly didn’t know how to answer. I’ve gotten so caught up in the need to create something (I blame capitalism honestly) that I’ve forgotten that in order to honor the lands cycles means to honor my own cycles as well. 

So for myself and everyone who needs to hear this right now, your time of rest is proof that you are apart of the land. If your leaves have fallen or your water has receded, it’s okay to wait for them to come back. Sure sometimes we need to fight through blocks and “get back on the horse” but sometimes you need to value the times when your spirit says “enough”. And when you need it, return to those things that are sacred to you and let them remind you of the importance of renewal. 


Photo taken by Aaron Oberon. All images and content copyright by author Aaron Oberon, 2019. All rights reserved.

Trees at Night (2019).

Southern Kitchen Witchery

Southern Kitchen Witchery